Manasquan Municipal Records

RECORD GROUP: Municipalities
RECORD SERIES #: 8600.10
SERIES: Manasquan
DATES: 1888-2003
VOLUME:  51 volumes and 8 record cartons

Provenance
 
Historical records from Manasquan Borough were placed on deposit in the Monmouth County Archives and Records Center on March 12, 2008, pursuant to a municipal resolution and a depository agreement which provide that Manasquan Borough retains ownership of the records and that the Monmouth County Archives can provide access to them.  A supplementary deposit was made on August 20, 2009.
 
History
 
The following historical narrative about Manasquan Borough was prepared by Brian Wick, a borough resident, for the book, Town by Town: Impressions of Monmouth County (Freehold: Office of the Monmouth County Clerk, 2002):
 
Manasquan historically has attracted individuals to Monmouth County's southernmost beaches. The early settlement of the Unami Indians, the town's incorporation in 1887, and the modern day‑tripper demonstrate the attraction of beach, sea, and river.
 
Early area history indicates the Unami, a sub‑tribe of the Lenni‑Lenape, first settled here by migrating eastward from the Delaware Valley and laid claim to the land. The last two of these known indigenous claimants were Tom Storm and Andrew Woolley. They claimed to own all land between the Squan and Shrewsbury Rivers, and their claim was settled in a 1758 conference in Easton, Pennsylvania.
 
Manasquan, an Unami Phrase, was documented as early as 1685 in a record of quit‑rents or rent for land. Early settlers built the Osborne House (an inn that stood where Main Street and South Street presently meet), a salt works, a few houses and stores. Around 1815, Jacob Curtis established a tavern in this tiny, unnamed settlement. Timothy Bloomfield who, in 1825, named the settlement Squan Village acquired the tavern.
 
In 1850, a stagecoach running from New York to Manasquan ferried sailboat captains that had to dock at the small harbor in what was simply known as "Squan.” The village began to evolve from a small fishing community to a thriving population, which decided to return to the original and euphonic name of Manasquan.
 
"Men are living who remember when Squan was called 'Crabtown,’ when it was a way out of the world, when nobody came but to leave as soon as possible. It was away down along the shore where nobody went and nobody dwelt but some fishermen, who all lived at a poor dying rate but who, in the progress of events, have become representative men of the vicinity. Now behold what a change! 'Crabtown' has given place to 'Squan' and 'Squan' has become distasteful. We have come to more dignity and want a nicer name. Now thousands flock hither and are sorry when the time comes for them to leave. Now we have prosperous merchants, fine churches, eloquent and pious ministers, active mechanics, fine houses and a hundred other semblances of prosperity and thrift." ‑ The Sea Side, June 19, 1877.
 
Population increased in the 1880s as the village could be reached by rail from both Philadelphia and New York. Businesses, such as bridge building, lumberyards and fisheries flourished. William P. Taylor Steam Saw and Planning Mill was established in 1877, and the custom woodworking mill, now known as W.F. Sherman and Son, Inc. is still in operation at 84 Broad Street.
 
Pound fishing, or gathering fish with staked poles and nets, was an arduous business that became popular up and down the coast. Early on summer mornings, it was not uncommon to see long wooden boats drawn out of the surf by horse teams on the Manasquan beach. Local fisheries practiced this type of fishing until the mid‑20th century when motorized trawlers began to fish offshore and also drag the bottom for clams and lobsters.
 
Also during the 19th century, over 70 sea captains made Manasquan their home. One such notable was Captain John M. Grown (1808‑1896). He served as a sea captain in the Mexican War and was host to Robert L. Stevenson during a shore‑area visit. Captain Brown was awarded the Life Saving Association gold medal for aiding in the rescue efforts from the following shipwrecks: John Farnum, Cornelius Grinnel, New Era, New York, and Western World.
 
Main Street witnessed the construction of two and three‑story Victorian buildings. Most storefronts had covered porches, but gave way to cement sidewalks and a wider, paved road for automobiles. Small businesses were already established in the Borough and continue to flourish in town.
 
Recreational fishing has attracted many sportsmen through the years. Using the most rudimentary equipment of yesteryear of the high technology used by today's modern angler, those in search of stripers, fluke, founder, blackfish, tuna and other species have known Manasquan to be a fishing hotspot.
 
From the beach to Main Street, Manasquan has kept its small town charm and continues to attract those interested in sand, surf, and river activities.
 
 
Scope and Content
 
The first deposit of records consisted of 47 original bound volumes of textual material, in four record series:
 
Series 1
Governing Body Minutes, 1888-1980, 36 volumes
Series 2
Board of Adjustment Minutes, 1977, 1979-1997, 4 volumes
Series 3
Planning Board Minutes, 1954-2003, 5 volumes
Series 4
Roll Call Book, Governing Body, 1942-1948, 2 volumes
 
The 2009 deposit included Ordinances and Resolutions, as follows:
 
Series 5
Ordinance Books, 1891-1977, 4 volumes
 
Ordinances, 1881-1991, 7 record cartons
Series 6
Resolutions, 1982-1996, 1 record carton
 
Early ordinances in the books are handwritten and fragile, while some later ones are Thermofax copies which are light and heat sensitive.
 
The ordinances in the record cartons are in file folders.  In addition to ordinances, the folders often contain related documents, such as correspondence, reports, and in some cases, photographs.
 
The documents are arranged in chronological order within series.  See the Shelf List included with this inventory for more detailed information.
 
The volumes are arranged in chronological order. See the Shelf List included with this inventory for more detailed information.
 
Use
 
There are no restrictions on the use of the material. These records are also available on microfilm at the Borough of Manasquan Clerk’s Office. See below the following Shelf List for links to the digitized records.
 
GDS
3/20/2008
Manasquan Borough: Shelf List
           
Box
Volume
Dates
 
A
Governing Body Minutes
1888 - 1896
1
Governing Body Minutes
1901 - 1908
1
Governing Body Minutes
1909 - 1913
1
Governing Body Minutes
1913 - 1920
1
Governing Body Minutes
1920 - 1922
2
Governing Body Minutes
1923, Jan.-1924, Nov.
2
Governing Body Minutes
1924, Nov.-1926, May
2
Governing Body Minutes
1926, May-1927, Sept.
2
Governing Body Minutes
1927, Oct.-1929, Mar.
2
Governing Body Minutes
1929, Mar.-1930, Apr.
2
Governing Body Minutes
1930, Apr.-1931, Apr.
3
Governing Body Minutes
1931, Apr.-1932, July
3
Governing Body Minutes
1932, Aug.-1934, Apr.
3
Governing Body Minutes
1934, Apr.-1936, Apr.
3
Governing Body Minutes
1936, May-1938, July
3
Governing Body Minutes
1938, July-1940, May
3
Governing Body Minutes
1940, May-1942, June
4
Governing Body Minutes
1942, June-1945, Mar.
4
Roll Call Book, Governing Body, 2 volumes
1942 - 1948
4
Governing Body Minutes
1945, Mar.-1947, May
4
Governing Body Minutes
1947, Nov.-1949, Dec.
4
Governing Body Minutes
1949, Dec.-1951, Dec.
4
Governing Body Minutes
1951, Dec.-1954, Jan.
5
Governing Body Minutes
1954, Feb.-1956, Aug.
5
Planning Board Minutes
1954 - 1977
5
Governing Body Minutes
1956, Aug.-1959, Apr.
 
5
Governing Body Minutes
1959, May-1962, May
5
Governing Body Minutes
1962, May-1965, May
6
Governing Body Minutes
1965, June-1968, Dec.
6
Governing Body Minutes
1969, Jan.-1970, Dec.
6
Governing Body Minutes
1970, Dec.-1972, Sept.
6
Governing Body Minutes
1972, Sept.-1974, May
6
Governing Body Minutes
1974, June-1975, Aug.
7
Governing Body Minutes
1975, Aug.-1976, Oct.
7
Governing Body Minutes
1976, Oct.-1977, Dec.
7
Board of Adjustment Minutes, 3 volumes
1977
7
Governing Body Minutes
1978
8
Board of Adjustment Minutes
1979 - 1997
9
Planning Board Minutes
1978 - 1991
9
Governing Body Minutes
1979
9
Governing Body Minutes
1980
10
Planning Board Minutes, 3 volumes
1992 - 2003
 
Titles below are taken from the spines of the volumes.  Click for digital images below the municipal webpage links.
Page Last Updated: 10/22/2015 8:44:00 AM

Copyright © 2011 Monmouth County, NJ. All Rights Reserved. Privacy Policy and Disclaimer